Friday, 30 March 2018

The Top 7 Risk Factors for Oral Cancer (Part 2 of 3)

You know your dentist is looking for cavities during regular check-ups, but you may not realize your dentist can check for cancer at the same time. It’s estimated that approximately 51,540 people will be diagnosed with oral cancer and cancers of the throat, tonsils and back of the tongue in 2018.

Tobacco 
Whether you smoke it or chew it, tobacco use increases your risk dramatically. Smoking can cause oral cancer, as well as cancer in other parts of the body. Pipe smokers are also at a higher risk for developing cancer in their lips. Smokeless tobacco, like chew, can lead to many issues in your mouth, the most serious being cancer of the cheeks, gums, and lips.











Alcohol 
According to the American Cancer Society, 7 of 10 oral cancer patients are heavy drinkers. Heavy drinking, as defined by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), is an average of two drinks a day or more for men and an average of more than one drink a day for women. If you are a heavy drinker and a heavy smoker, your chances of developing oral cancer increase significantly.  












Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) 
The sexually transmitted disease is now associated with about 9,000 cases of head and neck cancer (specifically those occurring at the back of the tongue, in or around the tonsils) diagnosed each year in the United States, according to the CDC. People who are diagnosed with HPV-related head and neck cancer tend to be younger and nonsmokers. People with HPV-positive cancers have a lower risk of death or recurrence, even though these cancers are often diagnosed at a later stage because it develops in difficult-to-detect areas.  
 










To read the entire article visit MouthHealthy.org.

Jockey Hollow Dentistry 
M. Corey Johnson, DDS 
Karen K. Fenichel, DMD
5 Cold Hill Road South
Mendham, NJ 07945
(973) 543-4828  

JockeyHollowDentistry.com

Thursday, 29 March 2018

Sunday, 25 March 2018

Cosmetic Dental Imaging

Cosmetic Imaging

See how your new smile will appear before receiving any treatment! Cosmetic imaging allows us to show you the possibilities for your teeth and smile before you even start a treatment plan. Computer images of your teeth and gums can be shaped, replaced, added, or lightened, showing your future smile. It is exciting to actually see your treatment goal come to life.


Jockey Hollow Dentistry 
M. Corey Johnson, DDS 
Karen K. Fenichel, DMD
5 Cold Hill Road South
Mendham, NJ 07945
(973) 543-4828 
JockeyHollowDentistry.com

Friday, 23 March 2018

The Top 7 Risk Factors for Oral Cancer (Part 1 of 3)

You know your dentist is looking for cavities during regular check-ups, but you may not realize your dentist can check for cancer at the same time. It’s estimated that approximately 51,540 people will be diagnosed with oral cancer and cancers of the throat, tonsils and back of the tongue in 2018.

Regular visits to your dentist can help you detect such cancers early, and changing a few potentially harmful habits may help reduce your chances of developing them. Read on to find out the top risk factors.











Gender 
Men are twice more likely to get oral cancer. The American Cancer Society attributes this to higher rates of alcohol and tobacco use by men, but says more men of a younger age are being diagnosed with HPV-related forms of oral cancer.
 










Age 
Most people who are diagnosed with oral cancer are 55 or older, according to the American Cancer Society. HPV-related oral cancers, however, are often diagnosed in people who are younger.  
 










To read the entire article visit MouthHealthy.org.

Jockey Hollow Dentistry 
M. Corey Johnson, DDS 
Karen K. Fenichel, DMD
5 Cold Hill Road South
Mendham, NJ 07945
(973) 543-4828  

JockeyHollowDentistry.com

Thursday, 22 March 2018

Sunday, 18 March 2018

Oral Cancer Screening

Oral Cancer – Early Detection Can be a Lifesaver

When oral cancer is found early, treatment is quicker, easier, less invasive and 90% successful. With approximately 29,000 cases of oral cancer diagnosed last year, a fast and painless oral cancer screening is better than a good idea. That’s why we conduct a visual screening for oral cancer at every six-month checkup and cleaning. If the hygienist or doctor sees anything that gives them cause for concern, they’ll refer you to an oral surgeon. This screening could literally save your life!

Jockey Hollow Dentistry 
M. Corey Johnson, DDS 
Karen K. Fenichel, DMD
5 Cold Hill Road South
Mendham, NJ 07945

(973) 543-4828  
JockeyHollowDentistry.com

Thursday, 15 March 2018

Sunday, 11 March 2018

Dental Implants to Replace Missing Teeth

What’s So Bad About Losing a Tooth?

While you might believe that decay and accident or trauma are the most common reasons people lose a tooth, the true destroyer is gum disease. So is it a big issue to lose a tooth? Actually, losing even a single tooth can cause your other teeth to change position, which is not good. Missing teeth affects your ability to chew and to absorb nutrients from your food. Because it’s harder to chew with missing teeth, you may begin favoring softer foods with more carbohydrates, which can cause you to gain weight. Other bad things can happen, including your speech being altered. The gaps in your teeth may cause your face to change shape, creating a “sunken” appearance that can make you look much older than you really are.

Designed to match your remaining teeth, dental implants can replace one tooth or multiples and are the best way to treat a missing tooth (or missing teeth). They look so natural that at first glance even a dentist will have trouble telling the difference.


Jockey Hollow Dentistry 
M. Corey Johnson, DDS 
Karen K. Fenichel, DMD
5 Cold Hill Road South
Mendham, NJ 07945
(973) 543-4828 
JockeyHollowDentistry.com

Tuesday, 6 March 2018

Nutrition: What You Eat Affects Your Teeth

Below is an excerpt from an article found on MouthHealthy.org

Your mouth, teeth, and gums are more than just tools for eating. They’re essential for chewing and swallowing-the first steps in the digestion process. Your mouth is your body’s initial point of contact with the nutrients you consume. So what you put in your mouth impacts not only your general health but also that of your teeth and gums. In fact, if your nutrition is poor, the first signs often show up in your mouth. Here are a few helpful things to know about how what you eat can impact your dental health.

Diet and Tooth Decay
The foods you eat and the beverages you drink can have a direct influence on the incidence and progression of tooth decay, depending upon: 

  • The form of the food-whether it’s liquid, solid, sticky or slow to dissolve makes a difference. 
  • How often you eat sugary foods and beverages and how often you eat or drink acidic foods and beverages. 
  • The nutritional makeup of the food. 
  • The combination of the foods you eat and the order in which you eat them. 
  • Medical conditions you may have, such as gastrointestinal reflux and eating disorders, which can increase risk of cavities and weaken teeth.

How Snacking Affects Your Dental Health
For dental health, it’s recommended that people limit eating and drinking between meals. Of course, sometimes eating between meals must happen. Unfortunately, most people choose foods like sweets and chips for snacks; foods that harm teeth by promoting tooth decay. If you do snack, make it a nutritious choice-such as cheese, yogurt, fruits, vegetables or nuts-for your overall health and the health of your teeth. Did you know that certain foods can put you at risk for cavities and other dental health problems? Here are some MouthHealthy tips.

To read the entire article visit MouthHealthy.org.

The remainder of the article details the following:

  • Recommended Nutritional Guidelines
  • Foods That Harm Your Dental Health
  • Sugar and Your Dental Health
  • How Sugar Substitutes Affect Your Teeth
  • 4 Ways to Reduce Your Risk of Cavities


Jockey Hollow Dentistry 
M. Corey Johnson, DDS 
Karen K. Fenichel, DMD
5 Cold Hill Road South
Mendham, NJ 07945
(973) 543-4828  

JockeyHollowDentistry.com

Thursday, 1 March 2018

What if an Object Gets Caught in Your Teeth?

Learn what the American Dental Association's answer is to the question: "What if an Object Gets Caught in Your Teeth?".


The above video is found on the American Dental Association YouTube Channel.

Jockey Hollow Dentistry 
M. Corey Johnson, DDS 
Karen K. Fenichel, DMD
5 Cold Hill Road South
Mendham, NJ 07945
(973) 543-4828  

JockeyHollowDentistry.com