Monday, 30 October 2017

Diabetes and Your Dental Health # 2

November is Diabetes Awareness Month. This month we are featuring information found on MouthHealthy.org that discuss how diabetes can affect  your dental health. Below are two ways that diabetes can affect your oral health.

Change in Taste 











Your favorite flavors might not taste as rich as your remember if you have diabetes. It can be disappointing, but take the opportunity to experiment with different tastes, textures and spices to your favorite foods. Just take care not to add too much sugar to your food in an effort to add flavor. Not only can this affect the quality of your diet, it can also lead to more cavities. If you have a persistent bad taste in your mouth, see your dentist or doctor.

Infections 












Diabetes affects your immune system, leaving you more vulnerable to infection. One common among people with diabetes is a yeast infection called oral thrush (candidiasis). The yeast thrive on the higher amount of sugar found in your saliva, and it looks like a white layer coating your tongue and the insides of your cheeks. Thrush is more common in people who wear dentures and can often leave a bad taste in your mouth. See your dentist if you think you have thrush or any other mouth infection.

To read all '5 Ways Diabetes Can Affect Your Mouth' visit MouthHealthy.org.

Jockey Hollow Dentistry 
M. Corey Johnson, DDS 
Karen K. Fenichel, DMD
5 Cold Hill Road South
Mendham, NJ 07945
(973) 543-4828 
JockeyHollowDentistry.com

Wednesday, 25 October 2017

Gum Disease Treatments

A Healthy Smile, A Healthy Body

As nice as it is to look your best, it’s even more important to retain your healthy teeth and gums. More teeth are lost because of gum disease than any other reason, and recent studies have established a link between gum disease and your overall health. Fortunately, gum disease can be treated successfully, often without surgery. At Jockey Hollow Dentistry, we want all of our patients to have exceptional oral health. Our commitment to you includes paying strict attention to all of your needs so you look great and achieve superior health.

Jockey Hollow Dentistry 
M. Corey Johnson, DDS 
Karen K. Fenichel, DMD
5 Cold Hill Road South
Mendham, NJ 07945
(973) 543-4828 JockeyHollowDentistry.com

Monday, 23 October 2017

Diabetes and Your Dental Health # 1

November is Diabetes Awareness Month. This month we are featuring information found on MouthHealthy.org that discuss how diabetes can affect  your dental health. Below are two ways that diabetes can affect your oral health.

Gum Disease 











Notice some bleeding when you brush or floss? That may be an early sign of gum disease. If it becomes more severe, the bone that supports your teeth can break down, leading to tooth loss. Early gum disease can be reversed with proper brushing, flossing and diet. Research has shown gum disease can worsen if your blood sugar is not under control, so do your best to keep it in check.

Dry Mouth 












Studies have found people with diabetes have less saliva, so you might find yourself feeling parched or extra thirsty. (Medications and higher blood sugar levels are also causes.) Fight dry mouth by drinking water. You can also chew sugarless gum and eat healthy, crunchy foods to get saliva flowing. This is especially important because extra sugar in your saliva, combined with less saliva to wash away leftover food, can lead to cavities.


To read all '5 Ways Diabetes Can Affect Your Mouth' visit MouthHealthy.org.

Wednesday, 18 October 2017

Heart Disease Linked to Gum Disease

Gum Disease Can Contribute to Heart Disease and Even Stroke

The results are shocking! Recent medical research has proven the link between gum disease, stroke, and heart disease. Since heart disease is usually fatal, it is clear that gum disease is a serious matter. The American Dental Association has concluded that 8 out of 10 Americans have periodontal (gum) disease, making it the number one reason people lose their teeth. These are epidemic proportions, but because no one ever considered losing a tooth deadly, that label was never applied. But that’s all changed.

The American Academy of Periodontology states that “Studies found periodontal infection may contribute to the development of heart disease, increase the risk of premature, underweight births, and pose a serious threat to people whose health is already compromised due to diabetes and respiratory diseases.” The naked truth is that the bacteria that characterize periodontal disease moves into your bloodstream – straight to your heart.


Jockey Hollow Dentistry 
M. Corey Johnson, DDS 
Karen K. Fenichel, DMD
5 Cold Hill Road South
Mendham, NJ 07945
(973) 543-4828 JockeyHollowDentistry.com

Sunday, 15 October 2017

Wednesday, 11 October 2017

Dental Treatments with an Intra Oral Camera

Intra-Oral Camera Makes You a Part of the Team

Our dentists treat dental care as a joint effort. One of the ways they succeed in this approach is through the use of the high-tech intra-oral camera. This tiny video camera delivers a close-up image of the interior of your mouth. You become an active participant in each dental decision, because you can see what work needs to be completed and which teeth are doing well. You'll be delighted with the results!

Jockey Hollow Dentistry 
M. Corey Johnson, DDS 
Karen K. Fenichel, DMD
5 Cold Hill Road South
Mendham, NJ 07945
(973) 543-4828 JockeyHollowDentistry.com

Thursday, 5 October 2017

Halloween Candy: Your Dental Health Survival Guide

Below is an excerpt from an article found on MouthHealthy.org

With Halloween comes ghosts, goblins and goodies-and the sugar in those treats can play some unwanted tricks on your teeth if you’re not careful. 

Here’s why: The bacteria in your mouth are probably more excited to eat Halloween candy than you are. When the bacteria eat the sugar and leftover food in your mouth, a weak acid is produced. That acid is what can contribute to cavities. 

But don’t hang up your costume just yet. “Halloween is about candy, dressing up and having fun,” says ADA dentist Dr. Ana Paula Ferraz-Dougherty. “It’s OK to eat that candy on Halloween as a splurge as long as you’re brushing twice a day and flossing once a day all year long.”

To help you sort through the trick-or-treat bag loot, we have a rundown of some common candies and their impact on your teeth:
Chocolate
Chocolate is probably your best bet, which is good because it’s also one of the most popular kinds of candy handed out on Halloween. ├ČChocolate is one of the better candies because it washes off your teeth easier than other types of candy,├« Dr. Ferraz- Dougherty says. “Dark chocolate also has less sugar than milk chocolate.”

Sticky and Gummy Candies
Be picky if it’s sticky. These are some of the worst candies for your teeth. “This candy is harder to remove and may stay longer on your teeth, which gives that cavity-causing bacteria more time to work,” Dr. Ferraz-Dougherty says.

To read the entire article visit MouthHealthy.org.

The remainder of the article details the following:

  • Hard Candy
  • Sour Candy
  • Popcorn Balls

Jockey Hollow Dentistry 
M. Corey Johnson, DDS 
Karen K. Fenichel, DMD
5 Cold Hill Road South
Mendham, NJ 07945
(973) 543-4828 
JockeyHollowDentistry.com